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Carlton le Willows Academy

Nothing but the best

Character, Resilience & Wellbeing

Head of Department: Mr Tomlinson (mtomlinson@clwacademy.co.uk)

Character, Resilience & Wellbeing, incorporates Citizenship and Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE) and is taught at Carlton le Willows Academy from Years 7-9.

KS3: Citizenship
KS3: PSHE
KS3: RESILIENCE AND
CHARACTER BUILDING

KS3: Citizenship

A high quality citizenship education helps provide students with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, citizenship education should foster students’ keen awareness and understanding of democratic government and how laws are made and upheld.

Teaching citizenship will equip students with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. It should also prepare students to take their place in society as responsible citizens, manage their money well and make sound financial decisions.

Students are taught about the democratic government in the UK, including the roles of citizens, Parliament and the monarchy; about the operation of Parliament including voting, elections and the role of the political parties; the justice system, including the role of the police and the courts; the roles played by pubic institutions and voluntary groups and about money, including the importance and practice of budgeting and managing risk.

KS3: PSHE

All students in Years 7, 8 and 9 (often through the use of external agencies) are taught:

  • Drug & Alcohol Education
  • Financial Education
  • Sex and Relationships Education, including about puberty
  • The importance of physical activity and diet for a healthy lifestyle

Carlton le Willows is privileged to liaise with, and often host, many outside providers such as Equate, Tackling Threats to Emerging Children, Pintsize Theatre, Shelter, SharedEd, Yolo Road Safety and Prevent. Many of these providers deliver interactive workshops to our students throughout the academic year.

KS3: RESILIENCE AND CHARACTER BUILDING

What is Resilience?

Resilience describes someone who works well in a team and sticks to a task until it is finished: who is able to bounce back from life’s setbacks so they can achieve their goals. It is a mixture of well-being, self-control, optimism and determination; skills that can set students up for success at school so they can flourish in later life.

Can resilience be taught?

The answer, according to people with a growth mindset, is definitely ‘yes’. They see their qualities as things that can be developed through their dedication and effort.

Why do we teach resilience?

At Carlton le Willows we place education the whole child at the heart of the curriculum. We deliver resilience in Year 7 because by teaching resilience skills early, students can learn habits that help them get the most out of any given task as they progress through school.

The UK Resilience Programme (the UK arm of the Penn Resiliency Program) provides the right approach for our students. The skills students learn on the programme help them recognise and acknowledge their own strengths and vulnerabilities and as a result become more proactive in their learning. We also believe that 11-year-olds are more able to manage themselves and so make a smoother transition into secondary school. Our students learn the core abilities that comprise resilience.

Core resilience abilities

  1. Emotional Awareness – identify emotions in self and others, express emotions in appropriate context, control and regulate emotions, build positive emotion
  2. Impulse Control – control behaviour to achieve goals, delay gratification, gather more thinking prior to taking action (when appropriate)
  3. Optimistic Thinking – focus on the positive, identify what is controllable, believe in good outcomes, remain wed to reality
  4. Flexible and Accurate Thinking – think flexibly and accurately about causes and implications of adversities, broaden perspective
  5. Self-efficacy – know one’s own strengths and weaknesses, have confidence in one’s ability to cope with adversity, know which strengths, skills and strategies to call on
  6. Connection and Reaching Out – build strong connections with others, develop comfort with asking for help, take appropriate risks, support others through difficult times.

Seven Resilience Thinking Skills

Students will learn and practice seven specific resilience skills to develop and enhance each of the core abilities and learn how to apply these skills to meet challenges, bounce back from failure and achieve one’s goals. They are:

  • ABC – Identify beliefs about an Activating Event and the Emotional and Behavioural Consequences of those beliefs
  • Avoid thinking traps – identify and correct counter-productive patterns in thinking through the use of critical questions
  • Detective Icebergs – identify deep beliefs and core values that fuel out-of-proportion emotion and evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of those beliefs
  • Calm and Focused – build emotion regulation, increase positive emotions and mental fitness
  • Challenge Beliefs – increase flexibility and accuracy in thinking about the causes of problems to improve problem solving
  • Put it in Perspective – stop worst case scenario thinking, reduce anxiety and improve problem solving by identifying the worst, best and most likely outcomes in a situation
  • Real-time Resilience – shut down counter-productive thinking to enable greater concentration and focus on the task at hand.

RSE Scheme of Work - Year 7 

Puberty - Four hours teaching

Objectives:

Pupils understand the physical changes which take place at puberty and people witness these changes at different stages in their life

Pupils know the differences between male and female body parts. This is also covered in science lessons.

They are aware of the need for privacy and when behaviour can be described as inappropriate

They know how they can care for their body through physical hygiene and healthy life styles.

The emotional changes that puberty can bring and the need for self- esteem and assertiveness.

Awareness that sexuality can be a motive for bullying and how stereotypes based on gender can cause damage.

Pupils compare different relationships and the nature of true friendship.

The characteristics of respectful healthy relationships are explored.

RSE Scheme of Work - Year 8 

Child Sexual Exploitation - 1 hour teaching

Objectives:

All Pupils in year 8 are taught about Child Sexual Exploitation through a workshop pioneered by Pintsize Theatre (Ian Court). By the end of the performance, year 8 pupils will have an increased knowledge of:

What might constitute an unhealthy relationship. This will include an emphasis on understanding what consent to sex means, including consent within the context of the law. This will also reference the importance of only having sex when feeling ready to do so, what constitutes unwanted sex, the right to say ‘no’ to sex or unwanted attention and how best to avoid the risk of emotional or physical harm in relation to these issues.

What might constitute sexual exploitation. This will include references to and discussion around virtual and real world exploitation.

How CSE happens and how easily it can happen to any young person. This will include reference to and particular emphasis on, the role and tactics of the perpetrator/groomer

Who should or might take responsibility around addressing issues relating to CSE. In addition to highlighting pathways to support agencies, the project will also encourage young people to look out for their friends and to access support services outside the home environment if they are worried about them.

What to do if a young person is approached in an inappropriate way – who to tell and how to safely seek help.

How CSE is everybody’s responsibility and how professionals such as teachers and youth workers might take measures to keep young people safe.

The short and long term impact of CSE on families and friends.

RSE Scheme of Work - Year 9 

Marriage and Family

Consent, and the law

STIs, safer sex and sexual health

The effects of relationships on mental well-being

Healthy and Unhealthy relationships

E-safety

 - 7 hours teaching

Objectives:

Pupils will examine the decisions involved if considering a sexual relationship. They will discuss ways of resisting pressure to act in a way that they are not ready for.

They will examine the rights and responsibilities that a relationship brings, to both parties concerned and the need for responsibility and honesty with partners. Also, how these relationships contribute to human happiness. Pupils are made aware of what marriage is, including the legal status. Pupils can discuss why marriage is important to many people.

Pupils are aware of what the law decrees about sex

Pupils understand that sexual harassment and sexual violence is illegal.

Pupils are aware of the symptoms of key STIs (including HIV and AIDs). They are aware of ways of avoiding STIs. They know where to go to seek help if concerned.

Pupils compare different methods of contraception for different people in different situations. They know how to use a condom correctly. They consider the importance of seeking appropriate advice for any sexual health problems or concerns.

They will consider what makes a healthy relationship and be aware of the issues surrounding abusive relationships. They will consider the reasons why some people become parents at a young age. They will be aware of the demands of caring for a young child.

They will consider whether their social media profile is safe and identify information that we should not make public (E-Safety). Pupils understand what is meant by the term consent and identify cases where consent has or has not been given. Pupils will correctly identify when pornography can be harmful to viewers, and people in the industry. They will consider the consequences of sexting and legal consequences for breaking the law.

 All pupils in year 9 are delivered a workshop, run by Pintsize Theatre Company, which asks how teenagers exercise choice and accept responsibility in terms of their relationships and sexual behaviour. It aims to increase awareness of sexually transmitted diseases and the consequences of becoming a parent at a very young age. This workshop focuses on the fact that in the UK today, many teenagers experience their first sexual encounter whilst under the influence of alcohol, and clearly illustrates the potential health risks and risk of pregnancy related to unprotected, underage sex and to define the legal, personal and social implications resulting from this behaviour.

Interactive Workshop Year 8 

This interactive drama workshop Abigail's Story looks at issues around online grooming awareness, internet safety and child sexual exploitation. 

Jonno and Abigail are both teenagers, they are boyfriend and girlfriend, they met online but have now begun to meet in real life. They love and care for each other, very much – or do they? Not all is as it seems and 14 year old Abigail needs help to recognise that the boyfriend she loves and trusts is not whom he seems. Content includes:

  • What might constitute an unhealthy relationship online and how risks online might be translated into risks in real life. This will include an emphasis on understanding the risks involved in social networking, and how images and words posted online, are in a public not private space. It will put particular emphasis on how people can pretend - online - to be other than they are in real life.
  • What might constitute sexual exploitation. This will include references to and discussion around virtual and real world exploitation and the dangers of posting images of oneself online.
  • How CSE happens and how easily it can happen to any young person. This will include reference to and particular emphasis on, the role and tactics of the perpetrator/groomer
  • Who should or might take responsibility around addressing issues relating to CSE. In addition to highlighting pathways to support agencies and protection, the project will also encourage young people to look out for their friends and to access support in the school environment, if they are worried about them.
  • What to do if a young person is approached in an inappropriate way – who to tell and how to safely seek help.
  • How CSE is everybody’s responsibility and how professionals such as teachers and youth workers might take measures to keep young people safe
  • The short and long term impact of CSE on families and friends.

Interactive Workshop Year 9
 

Karen and Lee is a one-hour interactive workshop. It focuses on the fact that in the UK today, many teenagers experience their first sexual encounter whilst under the influence of alcohol; the project investigates the potential consequences of unprotected sex at an early age. Its intended outcomes are as follows:

  • To explore the role that alcohol can play in leading young people into risk taking  and/or abusive behaviour, particularly in relation to sexual relationships and parenting.
  • To raise the issue of what ‘consent to sex’ means when one or both partners are under the influence of alcohol.
  • To raise awareness of how peer pressure, low self-esteem and life expectations can lead to alcohol related risk-taking behaviour and the coping/avoidance strategies available to deal with such pressures.
  • To clearly illustrate the potential health risks and risk of pregnancy related to unprotected, underage sex and to define the legal, personal and social implications resulting from this behaviour.
  • To raise awareness of the short- and long-term consequences of underage teenage pregnancy and parenthood for individuals, families and society.
  • To promote questions relating to the definition of responsible parenting (particularly in relation to fatherhood) and the role that alcohol can play in damaging the emotional and physical health of families.
  • To promote awareness of local and national sexual health and alcohol treatment/support services available to young people and the basic principles of confidentiality embedded in these services.

 

Right to Withdraw 

Parents and carers have the right to request that their child is withdrawn from any or all aspects of relationships and sex education, other than the biological aspects which are part of the programme of study for science. If you wish to withdraw your child please email office@clwacademy.co.uk